Jump to content

Recommended Posts

I read with interest the latest article on the Atomos NEON Monitors and was kind of gobsmacked at the prices, notable the 24" model ~AUD$9000. This made me think back to professional level photographic editing monitors and so I had a look at one supplier that I used quite some time ago when I was more into photography.

An Eizo ColorEdge CG279X 27" Monitor is AUD$3988 and, unless I've missed something, has better specs than the Atomos monitors. The only difference that I can see is that it doesn't have SDI input, but that would be easily resolved with a Blackmagic interface/converter device (I think). Or you could have the Eizo ColorEdge CG2420 24" Monitor for AUD$2452. Plus there are other brands that are a lot cheaper and still with impressive specs.

Am I missing something, or is this another case of gouging everyone involved in film production as much as is possible?

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Max brightness of 350 cd/m2 so it isn't suitable for HDR. NEON has onboard recording, SDI, it is upgradable in the future., and it can be used as a monitor out in the field.I do agree it is expensive, given how much you can buy a large 65" HDR LCD TV for these days. Look how much a lot of 7" monitors cost. I guess they are not making hundreds of thousands of units, so the prices are always going to be more. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I was mainly looking at it from a studio perspective, not field use (you'd want to lug a 24" monitor into the field?). These Eizo monitors are designed for professional, high quality editing. They provide high bit depth, wide gamut, LUTs, precision calibration etc. One of the questions asked after the review was whether you could use these for editing. Yes, but there are much better options.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

For a brand like Atomos to price a monitor up there with something like a Sony BVM (which are considered amongst the top few best monitors out there) is really brave. They must be super confident it's great!

Admittedly it's kinda different - the NEON records too, and will have a nicer User interface... but ultimately it's the quality of the image that matters.

I have always wondered why top-tier photographer/graphic design monitors (such by Eizo and NEC) are not generally as expensive as their video counterparts. SDI and monitoring tools (WFM, tally, peaking, zebras, etc) aside, as far as image is concerned, surely top-tier professionals working with colour grading etc demand similar levels of quality and precision calibration in both worlds?

Maybe refresh rate and stability are big factors. And actually as Matthew says, output power.

Having said that, NEC do have a 27" monitor that is $10,429...

Also, I do recall about 10 years ago when I worked at a major post house, they did have Eizo monitors in all their Flame and Smoke suites. They also had 16:9 Sony BVM CRTs for the main preview, but the working monitors were all Eizo, IIRC.

Oh, haha, and the Eizo CG3146 which is a 31" DCI 4K (17:9) HDR reference monitor is $30,000, but yeah - same ballpark as Sony's top BVM.

Funny old world!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Without doubt image quality is really what counts, but I'm not quite sure whether recording capability is so important once you are looking at monitors of this size (and price). Are these monitors going to record ProRes RAW from consumer cameras? Now if you plan to use these Atomos monitors as extra-large, recording, field monitors, then those other features are clearly needed, but for studio work I doubt that to be the case.

There's no doubt that reference monitors demand the prices they do for good reason but, even so, the less expensive Eizo monitors are still probably way up there when it comes to image quality. I have to admit that I'm not a big fan of Atomos anyway, given my very limited experience with their products, and that clouds my view. I can't help thinking that Atomos is always trying to put lipstick on a pig.

But I guess my problem is that coming from the photographic industry where anything that's considered expensive, in the film industry is usually considered chicken feed or chump change. So my issue is that I'm always looking at these things in a completely different historical light. But being a Blackmagic owner, I realise that you don't have to sell your soul to own reasonably high quality gear; and therein lies the conundrum.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Video and film equipment has always been very expensive, but it’s a lot more affordable today than it was in the past.

In the video world if you can sell a couple of thousand units of something that’s considered to be a successful product. 

The only way for most companies to sell things cheaper is to sell a lot of that product. The Eizo monitors are used across so many different industries. They sell significantly more of those than Atomos will ever sell. 
 

 
 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 hours ago, Matthew Allard ACS said:

The only way for most companies to sell things cheaper is to sell a lot of that product. The Eizo monitors are used across so many different industries. They sell significantly more of those than Atomos will ever sell. 

That's true, or perhaps do what the Vitec Group is now doing after buying up many film and photographic gear manufacturers, re-badging one manufacturer's product with another's name. Make it once, sell it under many names.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
16 minutes ago, Matthew Allard ACS said:

Still doesn’t make it cheap unless you can move lots of product. Anything made in small numbers will always be more expensive than mass produced items. 

Can't disagree with that, but then if you are offering a very expensive product because of limited sales potential, then it really has to offer something that truly makes it worth the asking price. Leica can place a high price on their cameras because they are more akin to a Veblen good, but I can't see an Atomos monitor being in the same league.

But then I'm too new to this industry and maybe enough people will see these monitors as value products. I have to smile though, Blackmagic have a 15.6" 4K broadcast monitor that appears to have similar specs, for AU$1500, so I wonder how much effort it would take to make a larger monitor that would compete and at what cost?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • New Posts

    • Hi, this is Tom. I've been primarily working at NBC News for the last 25 years, mostly shooting Dateline. I'm also now a professor at Chapman Univ's Dodge Film School.
    • @Cottycam welcome!
    • Looks good Steve! I still have my F3 that I bought back in 2011. It was a very underrated camera and it is now a bargain if you don’t require 4K.
    • Evening all, Came across this page by chance and thought I would chirp up as a new PMW-F3 user. I'm a long time staff and then freelancer working in the UK for 41 years on broadcast news, on XDCam EX since about 2012. My son's followed me into the game and as I do less for TV and more and more web stuff, I gave him my kit and looked for something a bit more er, compact. Initially I was using a C300 for the occasional regional BBC day and sailing features and web adverts (I'm refitting a 45 yr old yacht for retirement). I had a couple of Nikkors converted to EF mount and de-clicked, a 16-35/2.8 and 70-200/2.8, and I used an EF 24-105 for run-n-gun. All okay, but I hate the C300 form factor and all those buttons just got on my man-boobs! Looked for something more viable and stumbled across the F3. Managed to grab one for 800 quid off eekBay and got very lucky: the thing was unmarked and had only 147 hours on the clock. Had it a few months now and it really has grown on me. The menus I'm familiar with obviously and don't mind their foibles. I shot a sailing doc in S-log for the first time recently, and it's due out in December so I'll put a link up in due course. I've perfected my setup (see pics) and what I like about this is that I can do all the things a proper shoulder camera can do, and then break it down into the simplest, lightest, setup for stumbling about a foredeck with one hand on the camera only. I'm a bit of a fettler, so you might notice a few things. Viz: built-in viewfinderectomy. Custom mount for the Alphatron 035 VF (which I love using). Power via a Hawk-Woods V-Lock adapter plate meant for an FS5 - only needed the output lead swapping for a 4-pin XLR to go into the F3 - that Alphatron is a power-grabber. Custom extension bracket from the Tilta baseplate to the Movcam wooden grip (another eBay bargain for 50 quid) although the record button is non-functional as of yet with no LAN port on the F3. Custom bracket to get the right height off the baseplate for the Vocas matte box and rails. I think I spend more time building this stuff than actual filming these days! Very pleased with it all and giving 35M/bit in the camera, still fine for local BBC, not that anyone asks. I gave my Black Magic Video Assist to the lad, but I'm highly unlikely to get called on for high end broadcast. No 444 key installed but no biggy. For quality web production and some news squirting, the camera is great, and I will be playing with this for hopefully a few years yet. FX6? FX9? Nah, sod that for a lark. Happy as Larry here 😉 Cheers, Cotty (Steve Cottrell)
×
×
  • Create New...