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Canon release more EOS R5 Specifications

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View the full article:  https://www.newsshooter.com/2020/04/20/canon-eos-r5-specifications/

 

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The EOS R5 certainly bucks the trend of Canon crippling it’s mirrorless and DSLR cameras when it comes to video specifications. With the R5, Canon seems to have swung for the fences instead of deciding to bunt and play it safe.

The R5 will be able to record 8K RAW internally at up to 30p to the CFexpress card. Canon hasn’t said exactly what type of RAW it is, but it is safe to assume that it is the same RAW light being used in the C500 Mark II and C300 Mark III.

For those who don’t want to record RAW, you can also record 8K at up to 30p in 4:2:2 10 bit Canon Log in H.265. You also have the option to record 4:2:2 10 bit HDR PQ in H.265. In all of these modes the full width of the sensor is being used so there is no crop.

The camera can also record 4K at up to 120p in 4:2:2 10 bit Canon Log using the full width of the sensor. This is impressive. We are not sure if the 120p is available in UHD and 4K DCI.

Screenshot 2020 04 11 at 10 38 23 PM 1

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Solid stuff, very impressed by how Canon has finally embraced video as a feature in their cameras and moving away from the "crippling" we've seen. I'm sure it took a lot of engineering to make this work, as it is very impressive to have the amount of features in this small body. 

This camera is a great option for hybrid shooters who do a lot of stills and video work at the same time, it also looks like a great small camera for Canon users. 

It will be exciting to see the camera in the hands of creators where we can se how it performs. 

The eco-system is not quite as well rounded as I would want. An XLR-adapter would be great to have as I'm used to having that with my old Sony A7sII. That really makes the camera workable in more settings as far as I'm concerned. 

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I had the chance to go hands on with the R5 a few days ago and take a few video test shots. Here's some things that jumped out at me:

- The IS is really strong. I've had limited experience with in body IS in the past but was never that wowed by it, but this felt like I was seeing 70-200 level of stabilisation on a 50mm prime that has no lens IS. This is pretty massive and I'm looking forward to testing out all kinds of non-IS lenses on it to see the results.
- 120fps 4K 10bit is rock solid. Really fun to have this in such a small body
- 8K raw is pretty hefty in terms of file size (Matt's given the recording times in his article) so I doubt that will get much use, but nice theyve also included compressed 8K files as I didnt think that was a given
- Love seeing DCI included 
- Eye detect AF in video performs really well, lot of fun when paired with the 120fps
- Same style LPE6 battery but with 30% longer life battery than the LPE6N is handy
- Currently only shoots Canon Log 1 in video. Would love to see this change down the track as C500MKII and C300MKII dont include Canon Log 1 anymore and it'd be ideal to match these cameras out of the box with Clog2 or Clog3.
- The R6 looks pretty great as well, seems like a decent alternative to the R5 if you dont need the 8K or 4K 120fps
- Will be interested to see what the ISO/noise performance is like in video. The R6 is being marketed as a better low light performer so that does raise the question of how well the 45 megapixel sensor on the R5 handles noise.

Looking forward to using the camera a bit more in the coming weeks and will aim to get a video together stepping through some of the video-centric features if I'm able to

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@Dave May Interesting tidbits, Dave. Appreciate your insight! 

The omission of Canon Log 2 and 3 is a bummer, as I would think it makes it easier for Canon shooters to match it with the C300MKII/MKIII and C500MKII. As far as I know the Canon Log 1 maxes out at 12 stops of dynamic range, so it does makes sense since the R5 won't capture more than that (as far as I know, think).

I think this camera is really strong, looks like Canon wants it to be the Canon 5D Mark II of this time. A camera that masters stills and video equally good. I think a lot of people will have great success using this camera. It gives you great video features and some of the best stills capabilities of a mirrorless camera. 

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@Dave May great to see your insights. They were already very valuable on the C500ii. 

What I do not understand why the still use a fragile Micro D HMDI port?

@Martin Håndlykken

They don't want to add Clog2 / 3 because it will limit C300iii sales for sure. 

 

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@Clermond I've got a hard time believing in that, makes more sense to not include RAW if you want to protect the cinema cameras. I think one of the reasons it's left out at this stage is that Clog  1 is optimized for 12 stops of dynamic range, and Clog 2 and 3 is for 14-15+ stops. I dunno.

In question to the Micro HDMI-port, it's a real bummer sure, but understandable at the same time. I'm very curios about the new A7sIII (if it's even called that), from what Sony have been saying they might migrate it even further into a cinemacamerahybrid than ever seen before and include full HDMI or even SDI, internal ND? That would make a lot of sense to make it into a more "fully featured" video camera. Exciting times!

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@Clermond Totally agree, it's definitely looks like a great B-cam, just like the A7-line is for the FS7/FX9. Also a great small camera to have on you to shoot stills and grab B-roll with. 

Realistically you can't shoot 8K RAW for a lot of projects, since it will EAT space both on cards and on drives. It's a shame you can't do 4K RAW to match the C300MKIII or C500MKII, but personally I would probably not shoot RAW in most cases anyway.

I hope we'll get to see some projects shot on the R5 soon. Canon have in the past done shoots with DPs and producers to market the camera that give a way better picture on how it is to use in the real world.

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When you noted battery life, you said it gave ' you 1 hour and 20 minutes of recording time when shooting 8K RAW and utilizing IBIS and autofocus.' Is this a real world test or just from the canon specs? I'm very interested in such figures because after nearly two years, people are still complaining about the battery life of the BMPCC4K which, when comparing battery apples with apples, isn't bad at all.

In my own tests, using a genuine Canon LP-E6N battery, I can get 50 min of 4KDCI BRAW 5:1 recording. Wolfcrow managed 75 min of 1080p with the Panasonic S1. The former has a 14Wh battery and the latter a 23Wh battery. With a 23Wh battery the BMPCC4K would achieve 80 min of 4KDCI BRAW and, with a 48Wh IDX NP-F970 equivalent, gets over three hours continuous shooting. So I'm interested in how the real world tests pan out for these new cameras.

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Posted (edited)

Curious also as to why all the formats have a recording limit (max 29.59 min). Is this about the EU limits on what constitutes a stills camera vs video camera?

Reading further on in the review, it appears that it's all heat related.

Quote

4K 60p movie copped recording has restrictions on possible recording time due to the temperature rise. Max possible recording time is approx. 25 min. (at room temperature).

That's not very good at all.

Edited by Australian Image (Ray)

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I have to say that after all the pre-release hype, I'm somewhat underwhelmed by what it offers. The much hyped features seem to be 8K, IBIS and AF, yet for a camera that appears to be aimed at videographers (I assume), it certainly lacks some basic features.

It has no decent audio input, only a 'micro' HDMI output, limited continuous recording time, no external recording, no external power input, 12 stops dynamic range (?), 10 bit recording and a hefty price tag. 

I'm sure it'll sell like hot cakes, but for what?

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1 hour ago, Australian Image (Ray) said:

I have to say that after all the pre-release hype, I'm somewhat underwhelmed by what it offers. The much hyped features seem to be 8K, IBIS and AF, yet for a camera that appears to be aimed at videographers (I assume), it certainly lacks some basic features.

It has no decent audio input, only a 'micro' HDMI output, limited continuous recording time, no external recording, no external power input, 12 stops dynamic range (?), 10 bit recording and a hefty price tag. 

I'm sure it'll sell like hot cakes, but for what?

You can record externally. 

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3 minutes ago, Matthew Allard ACS said:

You can record externally.

I missed that part. Or are you referring to using an external monitor/recorder? I was thinking about recording directly to an external SSD.

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5 hours ago, Australian Image (Ray) said:

I have to say that after all the pre-release hype, I'm somewhat underwhelmed by what it offers. The much hyped features seem to be 8K, IBIS and AF, yet for a camera that appears to be aimed at videographers (I assume), it certainly lacks some basic features.

It has no decent audio input, only a 'micro' HDMI output, limited continuous recording time, no external recording, no external power input, 12 stops dynamic range (?), 10 bit recording and a hefty price tag. 

I'm sure it'll sell like hot cakes, but for what?

Personally I wasnt surprised or bothered by things like 3.5mm audio, micro HDMI, record time limits etc. In a world of DSLR video these things are all pretty standard and part of what helps makes the mirrorless camera bodies a comparatively cheap and compact option. If you want all those other features then the C300MKIII or the C500MKII are where it's at.

External recording is over the HDMI port so you can go to an SSD with something like a Ninja.

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All of the above is why I went for the BMPCC4K as soon as it was available for pre-order. My Olympus E-M1 MkII is ostensibly equiped in exactly the same way as this new R5 and which is why I hated it for video (I'm just not a fan of hybrid cameras).

The external recording via a monitor is just another cost and who knows what formats can actually be recorded.

It's by no means an inexpensive camera for many, yet lacks some fairly obvious features for what is being presented as primarily a video camera.

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@Australian Image (Ray) I disagree that the R5 is primarily presented as a video camera. Sure, the video features are advertised heavily, but so are the stills features. It's a very serious stills camera that might be easy to overlook for videographers and cinematographers. it takes 20 fps with a 45mp resolution which is something a lot of photographers will be amazed by.

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@Australian Image (Ray) Atomos said today you can record up to 4K 60p out of the HDMI into a Ninja V in either Prores or DNX.

Personally I'm not a big fan of bulky external monitor/recorders, one of the big appeals of the R5 to me is that it's small so I'd be keen to do as much as possible internally.

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7 hours ago, Martin Håndlykken said:

I disagree that the R5 is primarily presented as a video camera.

Given that it's screaming 8K to everyone, I think it's safe to say Canon wants the video capability to stand out. Who is the competitor for the R5, I'd say the Panasonic S1H and the Sony A7S equivalent. While they can take great stills, it's the video component that most people talk about.

 

6 hours ago, Dave May said:

Personally I'm wouldnt be a big fan of strapping a big external monitor/recorder to an R5 if I got one, the appeal of it to me is that it's small.

I suspect that cages, monitors etc will be big items for many R5 owners. I'm already seeing monster rigs for the Sigma FP cropping up everywhere.

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@Australian Image (Ray) Sure, they scream about the 8K to get people into it. But I think you're underestimating how many still photographers this camera is marketed towards. This is a 5D mirrorless equivalent. Very good in both disciplines, and I think that it is the fact that it shoots great stills AND video that makes it sell loads. 

People who want still features and AF can't buy the BlackMagic 4K and 6K since it does not do stills. S1H does great video, but no AF in video mode and Panasonic never have been big in the stills world. A7R IV is the closest competitor in my book, but that is geared towards more megapixel shooters and the video features are nowhere near this.

The new Sony A7sIII (or whatever) probably won't be as fully fledged in the stills mode as this.

People who only have a mirrorless camera to shoot video on probably will rig it up because when you're shooting video with an A-cam you need it to be big. While us who own bigger cameras that we usually use as an A-cam buy this as a B- or C-cam we just leave it small to get other angles and stuff. 

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Posted (edited)

You may be right. I guess only time will tell.

But just as an aside, the R5 is mooted to cost around AU$6000 and the 5D MkIV costs around AU$4000. That's a hefty price difference for say a wedding photographer/videographer.

Edited by Australian Image (Ray)

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5D Mark IV is a couple of years old so than increases the price difference a bit. But the R5 is expensive, and the RF-lenses are also a lot more expensive than their EF counterparts. Same with the Sonys, very expensive. At the same time the mirrorless cameras bring a lot of features not in DSLRs. Faster fps, no audible shutter if you need to, eye AF, some prefer EVF for better knowledge of what their photo will turn out. Probably some more advantages, but I've never shot stills on mirrorless.

I know photojournalists will appreciate the R5. I know plenty that several years ago begged Canon for a mirrorless competitor to the A7-series of cameras. They're used to the 5D etc and shoot both stills and video. Some even sticked to the 5D Mark IV to keep being in that eco system. They're going to swarm the R5 I'm sure, especially when more accessories come out for it and more lenses. They can also adapt their EF-lenses and transition slowly to RF.

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I've been using mirrorless cameras for some years and they have many benefits/advantages over traditional DSLRs. I couldn't see myself ever going back to a DSLR for any reason. I think the R6 will become a far more popular camera for the likes of wedding photographers/videographers given its pricing and features.

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On 7/11/2020 at 12:30 AM, Martin Håndlykken said:

I know photojournalists will appreciate the R5.

You'll probably end up seeing both an R5 and an R6 in most photojournalists' bags. I had a Sony A9 for a little while (won in a Sony giveaway) and almost overnight the electronic shutter and eye focus tracking fundamentally changed how I shoot (stills) after decades of that semi-pretentious Cartier-Bresson "decisive moment" stuff. I'll always miss Kodachrome in a Leica R6.2 or Nikon F3T but I can do things with that new tech that simply weren't possible before, and I was pretty good at manually focusing and religiously single-punching in order not to get lazy, or miss moments, leaning on the motor drive. 

But yeah the R5 is a stills camera. It may sound like it's being hyped as a video camera but I think that's just Sony giving them a bit of a scare. I ended up selling the Sony because it was so hard to match the colors to the Canon palette. 

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Forgot to mention the R6 may prove more popular amongst photojournalists due to its inevitable better low light rendering, which is probably going to be more important than having 45 megapixels. And you can essentially get two for the price of one R5, which is also valuable, having backup bodies in the field. 

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Posted (edited)

When I was doing photojournalism, I don't think one photographer that I met had a brand new (digital) camera or lens, the vast majority used cameras that were maybe two models old and lenses often much older. Now that most newspapers etc simply have their journos usually shoot (and record) with a mobile phone, I wonder how many photographers are even employed by the media. I do see a couple of local journos carrying a mid-range DSLR and lens from time to time, but most that I come across now use their phones.

In fact, when I go about doing my personal documentary work, I think I have better gear (a legacy of past work) than most of the journos and my video gear is certainly of a higher order. I still see some very old ENG cameras in use and wonder why the crew doesn't have something a bit more modern.

Edited by Australian Image (Ray)
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