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Julian Hatch

Cloud Storage (dropbox, backblaze, google drive)

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Im currently considering replacing my 3rd copy of all of my files (approx 40TB and growing) with a cloud alternative..

So far im looking at backblaze, dropbox and google drive.. 

I have 100Mb/s connection at my office - however very local to me is hot desk location which has Gigabit connection (I believe its advertised as up to 10Gb/s)...

My plan is to hire a hot desk at this office precinct for a couple of weeks and look to upload all of my files and then just keep up with the rest from my own connection once the bulk is complete (probably average 100GB a week)

Does anyone have experience in doing this and or anything to look out for or any advice? 

Backblaze looks to be the cheapest but have heard you need to connect the drives every 30 days or else you lose the back up (this seems like a bad idea??)

Dropbox is the next cheapest and to be honest is the one im thinking looks the best and I already use dropbox currently on a small scale but am a little concerned on what sort of upload speed I can expect to get with their servers (cant find this advertised anywhere really...)

3rd option is google drive - you can qualify for an unlimited sized google drive if you are a g suite account with at least 5 users.. I already have an account with 4 users so would be adding a bit of extra money for this option but im going to guess their upload speeds are going to be the best? and possibly the data be the most secure there?)

Once again any advice much appreciated.. 

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From what I've read over the last few years is that while you can upload large quantities of files to those cloud services and do so at high speed, if you need to download any files, it's a completely different story. It's not just a slow process, but also potentially an expensive one, as some charge significantly for downloads of what's been stored.

Check all the fine print very carefully before you venture into any agreement, as not doing so could become costly and very painful. That's why I still maintain that local storage is still potentially the most cost effective, efficient and safe means of storing data.

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Linus from LinusTechTips tried to back up his library to Google Drive. They throttle the upload speed after 1000GB or so, making it very slow to upload. The download speed is also not that good. 

I've used Jottacloud before (Norwegian service, where I live, don't know how international performance is) and they provided unlimited space. You do however need to have the drives connected and Jottacloud only makes backups of the specific drives. A little fiddly, but fine.

I've kinda given up on a cloud backup option as it's too expensive and too slow. 

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I have looked at cloud based options myself too and have largely concluded it's still more cost effective to manage your own backups on local drives, and of course much easier should you need to access something from the archive. A friend of mine does use Dropbox with unlimited storage (costing around £450/year), though he initially had problems getting them to honour the 'unlimited' part.

I looked into Google Drive before too, but I think even though they have unlimited storage with the 5 users I'm fairly sure they still charge you per GB/month don't they?

Then Backblaze has the 30 day thing which is a bit of a pain. I'm considering getting a NAS that powers itself on and off daily for this purpose though, then even if I went away for a few months the backup should still be operational.

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I went the Google Drive route and have over 110Tb uploaded so far. We have 7 drive users so we have unlimited space.  They don't seem to throttle you after 1000Gb from my experience, although they only allow a single user to upload 750Gb per day. So my work around is logging into multiple accounts on a single machine and just making sure to not upload more than 750Gb per day to each account. The whole cloud route is a bit tedious and slow, so its not our sole backup solution, we still have another physical backup but since were using G-suite regardless we mine as well utilize the free G drive space.

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I also tried Google Drive and was not satisfied. Now using Dropbox for important files.
Otherwise I am saving it local few times.

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