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Jay

Review: Bright Tangerine Cage for C300 Mk III/C500 Mk II

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Mine arrived in Aus a couple of days ago.  Camera still a few days away however very impressed with how solid the build is while keeping it very light compared to its competitors.  

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How necessary do people think the side panels of the cage are when using the cameras with a fairly lightweight setup (PL-mount primes, matte box, v-mount and Teradek out the back)?

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6 hours ago, Mark K said:

How necessary do people think the side panels of the cage are when using the cameras with a fairly lightweight setup (PL-mount primes, matte box, v-mount and Teradek out the back)?

With the updated design, you can quite quickly remove the side plates and just leave the top plate & baseplate. They don't weigh much though.

One important part that the sidesplates do is add rigidity to the camera build and takes any stress from the top handle.

If you're just going lightweight, you may even choose to take the camera out of the cage if everything is clipped on, without rods as you don't need to disassemble the cage to remove the camera

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On 6/2/2020 at 2:30 AM, Mark K said:

How necessary do people think the side panels of the cage are when using the cameras with a fairly lightweight setup (PL-mount primes, matte box, v-mount and Teradek out the back)?

For me the side plates are an essential piece. The base of the c500ii, c200, and c300iii use a small screw on plate canon calls TB1. This relates to the issue that the base of the camera is not rock solid with whatever baseplate you are using. it is kind of wobbling. so if you use just a clip on matte box and no lens support you really want this sideplates to prevent the camera from shaking when you pull focus.

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36 minutes ago, Günther Göberl said:

For me the side plates are an essential piece. The base of the c500ii, c200, and c300iii use a small screw on plate canon calls TB1. This relates to the issue that the base of the camera is not rock solid with whatever baseplate you are using. it is kind of wobbling. so if you use just a clip on matte box and no lens support you really want this sideplates to prevent the camera from shaking when you pull focus.

Good to know. Thanks Gunther 👍

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