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Flowtech Tripod Time Tested Durability?

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I have some old, used Miller Sprinter sticks which are supposed to operate in a similar fashion to the Flowtech 100. You can flip the leg latches from a single position on the sticks and the legs will extended to the ground via gravity. But after a bit of abuse my Miller Sprinter sticks do not work like they're supposed to anymore. I had them serviced by an authorized Miller rep here in Los Angeles and they couldn't get them to function like they were originally designed to do. So now I have to manually pull down each leg, and each stage, after I release them, which is rather frustrating and time consuming. I have been eyeing the Flowtech 100 sticks for a long time, as they seem to be a better design.  But I wanted to wait and see if they actually stand the test of time. Has anyone out there been using the Flowtech sticks for bit, either the 75 or 100? Do they still work as they're supposed to?
 

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I've been using the flowtech 75 sticks since they came out, didn't go to extreme colds or heat, but still got loads of use, travelling, documentary/corporate stuff. Still works fine.

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Cool. I think I'm gonna take the leap. I've been talking to some folks across the internet and they all seem to like them a lot. It sounds like you just need to maintain them and clean periodically to keep them functioning at 100%. 

I also have a pair of 3 stage Miller Solo sticks which I have taken with me all over the world. I've been beating those things up for almost a decade now and they still work the exact same way as when I bought them. And admittedly, I've never serviced them or cleaned them once! They always seem to work perfectly. They've been in -30 degree weather up in Alaska and Minnesota and out in 120 degrees in the Mojave desert. They've been in water, sand, mud, dust, etc. Those sticks are proving themselves to be the most reliable piece of video gear I've ever purchased.

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Posted (edited)

I've had the Flowtech 100's since a few weeks to maybe a month after their initial release(my sales rep managed to get me a pair of legs away from a head/leg combo early on before the legs themselves were supposed to be available- Vitec wanted to sell packages first[$$$]). I've used Sachtler Speedlocks since late 2007(2x regular 100 Speedlocks and a 100 HD pair) and these are my GO-TO legs. I use them paired with a Vinten 100, as my 'A' set-up and have used them with a Vinten 250, too.  They are pretty much superior in every way to Speedlocks and every other ENG type legs that I've ever had or used in ~23 years of shooting.

Buy them and don't look back or have a second thought. And they're less expensive than the excellent Speedlocks, too.

 

Edited by Run&Gun
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On 5/1/2020 at 12:10 PM, DcD said:

I have some old, used Miller Sprinter sticks which are supposed to operate in a similar fashion to the Flowtech 100. You can flip the leg latches from a single position on the sticks and the legs will extended to the ground via gravity. But after a bit of abuse my Miller Sprinter sticks do not work like they're supposed to anymore. I had them serviced by an authorized Miller rep here in Los Angeles and they couldn't get them to function like they were originally designed to do. So now I have to manually pull down each leg, and each stage, after I release them, which is rather frustrating and time consuming. I have been eyeing the Flowtech 100 sticks for a long time, as they seem to be a better design.  But I wanted to wait and see if they actually stand the test of time. Has anyone out there been using the Flowtech sticks for bit, either the 75 or 100? Do they still work as they're supposed to?
 

I've been using the Flowtech 100 for quite a few years. I was beta testing before that. It has been absolutely rock solid and reliable. 

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I have read two reviews of the Flowtech that claim the legs will slip under pressure.  I have been looking for a new set of legs, but I'm a bit wary of this system.

I have two pairs of Sachtler Speed Lock CF legs, and both of them have slipping legs. There is a tiny screw that can add some tension to the legs, but they still slip. My camera has fallen once, trashing my teleprompter glass, and I can't afford to have this happen again.

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