Jump to content

Recommended Posts

Once this virus isolation is over and life returns somewhat to normality, I'm looking at covering some motor sport on a regular basis and will need an external audio recorder. I've narrowed it down to the Zoom F6 due to cost, performance (notably 32 bit recording) and size.

Now one thing I've come across in my research is that the line out causes a lot of noise when using it as a backup in-camera, at least with some cameras such as Sony. I use BMPCC4Ks, so I have no idea what that may mean and I was also thinking about using my Wireless Go units to transmit to the camera and not have to use a cable. Has anyone got any experience with the Zoom F6 and have they tried to use the camera as a backup audio recorder, wired or wirelessly, and how have they fared?

This is not a deal breaker for me, but I can't find any real world examples of what I might expect.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I use mine with the pocket cinema camera and lock time code out of the camera to the f6. I use the built in mics on the camera for scratch audio. Easy sync of the audio in final cut or resolve with time code. I do not connect the un balanced outs to the camera.  This works beautifully.. I wish the f6 had balanced outs but you’d have to go with the f8 or f4 which aren’t 32 bit or the sound devices mix pre 

John from Ohio 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I received my unit a few days ago and have been testing it out in various configurations, not fully tested, but good enough to now have a fair idea of what works.

One thing is absolutely certain is that the audio into my BMPCC4K (and even Olympus E-M1 MkII) is much better than just scratch audio. I've run some test with cable to the 3.5mm input on both cameras (still waiting for an adapter to test out the mini-XLR on the BMPCC4K) and I've run tests using my Rode Wireless GO units, all coming out of the line out plug or into the XLR port on the F6.

I can use the F6 in multiple ways with the Wireless Go units. I can have the transmitter on the F6 and send the audio from an attached mic to the Wireless Go receiver on the camera, or have the mic on the camera and split the audio to the camera and Wireless GO transmitter, with the receiver on the F6. Either way results in excellent audio.

I don't need a time code generator as the audio is synced perfectly using the Wireless GO units. I'm just using 3.5mm mics, a Rode VideoMic Pro+ and Rode VideoMic NTG. I'm waiting for a few more adapters so that I can test multiple mics going into the F6, but I'm pretty chuffed at how well it all works.

And I might point out that using the Wireless GO units to transmit the audio to the F6 still means I get 32bit float recording on the F6. The multiple mics will allow me to see if Resolve actually does split the Poly Wav files into discrete files automatically (it appears to do so from early tests).

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I’ve used the same mics plus xlr inputs. If you use the time code out of the pocket cinema camera it will lock to the f6 with out a time code generator.  Also I think the latest resolve update finally handles poly files. 
It’s simply faster and more accurate to line up the audio.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, Oldboy said:

 Also I think the latest resolve update finally handles poly files. 
It’s simply faster and more accurate to line up the audio.  

It does. I've only used a single mic so far, but next week will test with multiple mics to see how it displays poly wav files. With just the one mic, I get three audio files displaying (main and left/right), so I'm hoping that when say three mics are used, it will show all the files. This is much better that having to use something like Wave Agent.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I thought I'd put this out here for anyone that is contemplating Resolve or hasn't used Resolve and poly wav files. I finally received my XLR adapters, so that I could test three mics at the same time (two wireless and one wired) attached to my Zoom F6. The mics I used were Rode: VideoMic Pro+, VideoMic NTG and SmartLav+ and Wireless GO units.

The audio quality from the on-camera mics was very good indeed and I'm surprised at how much they were able to pick up being just camera mounted and quite some distance away. Additionally, all files were recorded in 32 bit float on the F6 and 24 bit in-camera. The 32 bit float is amazing and really does allow you to get great audio even from seemingly unrecoverable files.

What this means is that I can now just carry the F6 in a bag connected wirelessly to any mic and be able to record great audio with a backup in-camera. But most interestingly, Resolve automatically separated the poly wav files into the individual channels, as well as retaining the main combined file. This means that I don't need a program like Wave Agent that Premiere users need.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • Popular Topics

  • New Posts

    • An update to anyone interested, check out some of the cool submissions:  https://motionarray.com/learn/motion-array/on-my-desk-contest-submissions/
    • What lenses are you folks using? My brother has an XT-3 that I've poked around with enough to make me consider purchasing one, but the X mount makes me hesitate.
    • Hi Everyone. I've been scouring every corner of the internet for days now trying to figure out which camera to go for and I'm pulling my hair out. I'm looking for a versatile mirrorless camera for a mix of documentary and narrative work. I'm confident that all the options I'm looking at are suitable for the kind of narrative, commercial and music video work I do. However I also need something that I can use for documentary work - largely handheld. Sometimes filming actuality, following subjects around. Sometimes nice cinematic b-roll. I like to keep DOF relatively shallow. My priorities: - Good IBIS - Good lowlight - Ability to record and monitor audio - Good for photography - A good native zoom lens for general documentary work Secondary considerations: - 10- bit internal would be nice - Autofocus - AF is something I've never used in the past. Being trained in natural history filmmaking a decade ago - the idea of using AF for video was laughable. I'm unsure whether I'm missing a trick here. Is some AF now truly good enough to accurately track and keep focus on subjects at shallow depths of field? Right now it's a real toss up between the Panasonic S1, Nikon Z6 and the Fuji XT4 For a while I was pretty set on getting the Panasonic S1. I like the idea of a bigger camera for handheld work and the IBIS looks great. Internal 10 bit also appealing. But once I add the costs of the firmware upgrade and an expensive L-series zoom, the whole kit will cost around €3200, instead of around €2300 for the XT4 or €2100 for the Z6. I considered the Gh5 and A7iii too but I'm leaning away from them because of the bad low light and m4/3 mount on the gh5 and the lack of 10-bit recording (even externally) on the a7iii. I'm leaning towards full frame options for what they offer in terms of shallow DOF and low light capabilities. I have a set of old Nikon AIS primes which I love using and plan on adapting these to whatever setup I have. Any help here would be much appreciated!
    • Hi everyone, I'm just an arts hobbyist who tried filmmaking last year by making a short about my depression. Feeling the itch of having another go after focusing on my music since the film. Here to learn more about the craft and equipment, won't probably write so much, mostly here to read and listen 🙂 Short here if anyone want's to see it:    
    • Very excited to share the news that MZed has just launched a new masterclass with Oscar-winning editor, Tom Cross ACE. This course has been a very long time coming after our partners New Studios in China filmed his masterclass in Beijing and we're excited that it's reaching an international audience. Over eight hours Tom breaks down what is required of an editor working in Hollywood today, and how he approaches narrative editing through deconstructing several scenes from Whiplash, La La Land, First Man and Hostiles. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EoktkCDMMb4 You can watch the first module free here on MZed.com or in our iOS app. The course is $249, but you can also bundle it with an MZed Pro membership for $399 and save $149.
×
×
  • Create New...